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people

meet

up with their

friends

and families in the churches from

9.00pm onwards. The services

are normally finished shortly after

midnight, but some go onto

4.00am!

When the Christmas service

ends people go home

to eat the big Christ-

mas meal. All the

foods contain meat,

eggs and butter - all

the yummy things

they didn’t during

the Advent fast! One

popular course if

‘Fata’ a lamb soup

which contains

bread, rice, garlic

and boiled lamb

meat.

On the Orthodox

Christmas Day (7th)

people come togeth-

er in homes for par-

ties and festivities.

People often take

‘kahk’ (special sweet

biscuits) with them to

give as gifts.

Even though not

many in Egypt are

Christians, a lot of

people in the coun-

try like to celebrate

Christmas as a secu-

lar

holi-

day. Christ-

mas is becoming

very commercial and most

major supermarkets sell Christmas

trees, Christmas food and decora-

tions. Hotels, parks and streets are

decorated for Christmas.

In Egypt, Santa is called Baba Noël

(meaning Father Christmas). Chil-

dren hope that he will climb through a

window and will leave some presents!

They might leave some kahk out for

Baba Noël.

Christmas in Japan

Christmas is not widely celebrat-

ed in Japan as not many people

there are Christians. How-

ever, several customs

have come to Japan

from the USA such as

sending and receiving

Christmas Cards

and Presents.

In Japan, Christmas

in known as more

of a time

to spread

happiness

rather than

a religious

celebra-

tion. Christ-

mas

Eve

is

often